Wayuu Women

                                                       

The Wayuu are known as the people of the sun, sand, and wind. They are located in the arid Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia and northwest Venezuela. The Wayuu language is part of the Arawak family and is called Wayuunaiki. They survived the Spanish Conquest and had many fights and wars with the Spanish in the 1700′s. Today, there is thought to be around 110,000 – 140,000 Wayuu people living in Colombia.

They survived the Spanish Conquest and had many fights and wars with the Spaniards in the 1700′s. Today, there is thought to be around 140,000 – 150,000 Wayuu people living in Colombia, with another almost 300,000 living across the border in Venezuela. - See more at: http://bohobeachboutique.com/wayuu-tribe/#sthash.3gPEXBa8.dpuf
They survived the Spanish Conquest and had many fights and wars with the Spaniards in the 1700′s. Today, there is thought to be around 140,000 – 150,000 Wayuu people living in Colombia, with another almost 300,000 living across the border in Venezuela. - See more at: http://bohobeachboutique.com/wayuu-tribe/#sthash.3gPEXBa8.dpuf

The women of the Wayuu tribe have been hand weaving these bags for generations. Every single bag is different and unique, with intricate tribal designs and colors. Many of the designs that are woven into each bag represent the natural elements that surround the Wayuu, and what their culture revolves around, such as: animals, the sun, plants, stars. It takes these women 10-15 days to complete each bag; they are a labor of love.

We are working personally with the Wayuu women who hand make each bag, and have therefore cut out the middle men, making sure they are fairly paid, work in good conditions, and are taken care of. The popularity of these bags is a great thing for these women who sustain their villages’ economy by hand making these pieces and selling them.

One of our principal goals is to make our costumers relate with the story of each bag and the amazing traditions from the Wayuu tribe women who hand make them.